Difference between revisions of "Co-Requisite Course Model"

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To be sure, this idea has generated enormous controversy within the mathematics departments at virtually every one of Kentucky's four-year postsecondary institutions. [http://www.freedomkentucky.org/images/9/95/CPE_letter_by_math_dept_chairs_and_King%27s_Reply.pdf A May 28, 2015 letter signed by the chairs of the math departments at every one of these universities except Kentucky State University], and by several two-year school math heads, as well, speaks for itself. I am told the short, September 30, 2015 response letter from the president of the CPE which is found at the end of the math chairs' letter has generated even more ire within those math departments.
 
To be sure, this idea has generated enormous controversy within the mathematics departments at virtually every one of Kentucky's four-year postsecondary institutions. [http://www.freedomkentucky.org/images/9/95/CPE_letter_by_math_dept_chairs_and_King%27s_Reply.pdf A May 28, 2015 letter signed by the chairs of the math departments at every one of these universities except Kentucky State University], and by several two-year school math heads, as well, speaks for itself. I am told the short, September 30, 2015 response letter from the president of the CPE which is found at the end of the math chairs' letter has generated even more ire within those math departments.
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A far more detailed dissention from Kentucky math professor Steve Newman is also now released.
  
 
Clearly, there is something of a revolt under way in Kentucky regarding the attempt to destroy remedial courses in the state's college system. Professors in the math trenches obviously don't think this is going to work, but it clearly would tend to hide problems with inadequate preparation of Kentucky's public school students under the Common Core State Standards.
 
Clearly, there is something of a revolt under way in Kentucky regarding the attempt to destroy remedial courses in the state's college system. Professors in the math trenches obviously don't think this is going to work, but it clearly would tend to hide problems with inadequate preparation of Kentucky's public school students under the Common Core State Standards.

Revision as of 11:10, 19 October 2015

Co-Requisite Courses: It sounds like a very strange idea. Instead of offering remedial courses to entering college freshmen with low test scores on entrance and/or placement tests, the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education (CPE) says it will be creating new "accelerated" but credit-bearing courses for such students.

Somehow, the CPE says it can take students who are behind and magically accelerate them to finish their freshman year on an equal playing field with better prepared students.

To be sure, this idea has generated enormous controversy within the mathematics departments at virtually every one of Kentucky's four-year postsecondary institutions. A May 28, 2015 letter signed by the chairs of the math departments at every one of these universities except Kentucky State University, and by several two-year school math heads, as well, speaks for itself. I am told the short, September 30, 2015 response letter from the president of the CPE which is found at the end of the math chairs' letter has generated even more ire within those math departments.

A far more detailed dissention from Kentucky math professor Steve Newman is also now released.

Clearly, there is something of a revolt under way in Kentucky regarding the attempt to destroy remedial courses in the state's college system. Professors in the math trenches obviously don't think this is going to work, but it clearly would tend to hide problems with inadequate preparation of Kentucky's public school students under the Common Core State Standards.